Congratulating Our Holstein Scholars

Please congratulate our three Holstein Scholars for the 2018-19 school year who demonstrate a commitment to public service, scholarship, and public policy-making programs for the common good.

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Pascal Boctor, ‘19 – International Studies, minor Middle East Studies

Pascal Boctor is a Junior majoring in International Studies. He was raised in Egypt as a Christian in a Muslim majority country. Upon arriving in the U.S., he was exposed to issues of oppression and persecution, particularly in his own experiences in Egypt. His passion for public service developed when he attended public high school in Irvine, California. As a student at USF, and a current McCarthy Fellow in Sacramento interning for the CA Secretary of State, he continues to be involved with the Center and looks forward to participating in the USF in DC program in Spring 2019. Pascal intends to build the skills and knowledge to be a change agent and advocate for marginalized communities in Egypt and in the United States.

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Madeline Campbell, ‘20 – Politics, minor Public Service and Community Engagement and Criminal Justice Studies

Madeline first became involved in public service during her senior year of high school in Sacramento and has continued her engagement during her time at USF. Madeline started working with the McCarthy Center through their USF Votes initiative, helping to register over 1,300 new student voters in its inaugural year. She is currently a McCarthy Fellow in Sacramento and interns with Pinnacle Advocacy, a strategic advocacy and lobbying firm, and has will join the USF in DC program in Spring of 2019. Madeline also works with the ASUSF Senate and Reading Partners in SF.

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Aliyah Forbes, ‘20 – International Business and Cultural Anthropology

Aliyah Forbes is from Orange County, CA and comes from a family of five. Prior to USF, she had little exposure to social justice and activism. However, as a member of the Esther Madriz Diversity Scholars Cohort 12 and an Eco-Educator within the Office of Sustainability, Aliyah has developed a passion for public service and the environment. As a part of EMDS, Aliyah was an intern at San Francisco Rising and participated in public service throughout the Bay Area, in particular, organizing around the College For All ballot initiative. She plans on continuing her commitment to public service at USF by staying involved with SF Rising, studying abroad in the East and partaking in one of the McCarthy Center’s programs such as USF in DC or McCarthy Fellows in Sacramento.

Congrats to our 2017-18 Award-Winners!

As the end of the school year draws nearer, we reflect on all the people who have helped to advance our mission. Our 2017-18 awards recognize emerging leaders and influential community partners that value public service and the common good.  Please join us in congratulating them!

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Crystal Vega, ’18

2018 Leo T. McCarthy Award for Public Service

This award is presented to the graduating senior who, during their career at USF, worked to promote social justice through public service to create a more humane and just world. The award was established in honor of Leo T. McCarthy, recognized for his work for San Francisco and the State of California as a County Supervisor, Speaker of the Assembly, and as a three-term Lieutenant Governor who dedicated himself to those marginalized by the political process.

 

Giorgia Scezelo, Politics ’18 The School of Management Valedictorian  

Ali Defazio, Politics ’18  College of Arts and Sciences Valedictorian 

The valedictorian of the schools and colleges within the University of San Francisco exemplify the highest standards of leadership and scholarship in the Jesuit tradition. A leader in the finest sense of the word, the Valedictorian demonstrates selfless service to the University community while reflecting excellence in all academic pursuits.

Mrs. Lynnette White   |   Ms. Altheda Carrie   |    Ms. Brenda Harris

2018 Engage San Francisco Community Partner Awards for Western Addition Changemakers

The Engage San Francisco’ s Community Partnership award recognizes community members who have been critical to realizing the vision of our initiative. These three women have supported Dr. Stephanie Sears and Dr. David Holler and the Ester Madriz Scholars and the Martín-Baró Scholars over the past three years as students have gathered biographical information on the African American Changemakers depicted on the mural outside the Ella Hill Hutch Community Center. Their advisement, suggestions, connections, and knowledge have been instrumental to this project. 

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Mission Graduates

Community Partner Service-Learning Award

This award is presented to a USF community partner in recognition of outstanding service-learning collaboration with USF faculty members to co-educate students. The recipient of the award demonstrates institutional commitment to service-learning by providing meaningful student projects and service experiences, educating students on social justice issues, and facilitating mutually beneficial outcomes for students, faculty, and their own organization.

 

Beyond the McCarthy Center, one of our staff members has won a prestigious award in the community engagement field.

 

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Fernando Enciso-Márquez

2018 Richard E. Cone Award for Emerging Leaders in Community Engagement

The California Campus Compact award recognizes an exemplary early-career individual who is an emerging leader in the field of community engagement, whose work has had a positive impact on campus and in the community, and who is guided by the best practices of community-campus partnerships

 

Congratulations to our well-deserving students, partners, and colleagues!

Join our April Day of Action

Tamara

Tamara Walker is the Outreach Manager for the Buchanan Mall Initiative at Citizen Film, a non-profit documentary media organization and an Engage San Francisco community partner, based in the Western Addition.

On Saturday, April 14th, Citizen Film, Community Grows, the Rosa Parks Senior Center and a team of neighborhood volunteers will be rolling up our sleeves to plant, mulch, and clean up the gardens of the Buchanan Mall.

You may be wondering: what is a documentary media company doing organizing a volunteer garden day?

Since 2014, we’ve been working with residents of the Western Addition neighborhood, city agencies, and local non-profits to re-imagine the Buchanan Mall, a five-block park cutting through public housing near our office. Once unsafe and underused, the Buchanan Mall is becoming a connective point for the neighborhood, an example of unity and community storytelling.

As documentary filmmakers, we’ve often tackled social justice issues and used storytelling to advocate for equitable solutions to community problems. Creative placemaking — working to make a place better for all people who inhabit and use it — has been an exciting evolution of that practice. Through a process of collaborative documentary storytelling, the community arrived at a vision of what the park could be — a vision rooted in the collective memory of what the neighborhood once had been.

Residents have begun reclaiming ownership of their space by stewarding the community gardens along the Mall. We’ve partnered with Community Grows, the Rosa Parks Senior Center and Collective Impact to gather stories about the neighborhood’s history of growing food and feeding the community as a form of activism These gardens can do more than nourish the community; they are steps towards self-sufficiency and greater social justice.

The Western Addition was once a home and thriving cultural center for African-Americans, but the community remains scarred from urban renewal that has been repeatedly forced upon it since the 1950’s, displacing thousands of residents, shattering the local economy and engendering distrust. The films that we co-create with the community, the media and garden installations on the Mall, future murals, and media – these are all essential in keeping the community’s people, voices, and hopes front and center as another round of redevelopment looms. By co-creating films with local residents, and by actively soliciting and heeding their feedback, the community can take control of its own narrative.

Join us!

Buchanan Mall Day of Action: Saturday, April 14th 10am to 2pm RSVP here & please fill out the waiver form.

 

 

How Cobb Elementary Transformed Me

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Valeria Imendia, International Studies’18

I still remember receiving an email about a literacy internship opportunity during the fall semester of my junior year and thinking it would be a great chance for me to expand my experiences in education. As a student in the Dual Degree Program for Teacher Preparation, I decided to apply to be a literacy intern through Engage San Francisco but little did I know I would be embarking on an experience of a lifetime. I am now a senior, about to graduate this coming May, and I continue to learn so much about myself and my passion for teaching with every chance I get to walk the halls of Dr. William L. Cobb Elementary School.

From my very first day of the internship, I was met with nothing but kindness and support. My first impression of the school was more than I could have hoped for, and it continues to be a place of unique learning experiences for me. For one, every day at Cobb is different—whether it is because I have to work with new students and create activities for them on my own or because unexpected situations arise where I have to provide care for students. I first went in thinking of myself as a tutor for my students, but it was not long after I started my work there that I realized this job required a lot more than just academics. Every single student I have had the privilege to work with at this school has sparked so much passion for teaching within me, and I continue to think about them in everything I do as I pursue my teaching credential.

Alongside my students, my mentor at the school and my internship supervisor always go above and beyond to ensure that as interns we are being supported and guided in the best way possible. It has been thanks to their warmth and guidance that I have been able to feel like I have agency in my position as an intern. From day one, I have felt like I am a part of the school community and that is because I have been given the tools and the trust to bring my perspective into the work I do with my students. Hence, this program has been crucial in my journey as a future educator because it has shown me first-hand that there is a lot of work to be done in the classroom. It has likewise shown me in practice what my responsibility as a woman of color going into this profession looks like in order to ensure I am doing my best to advocate for our youth. My students have therefore opened up new possibilities within me and they have taken me by the hand and walked me through their life experiences and their passions, which is something that will be forever engraved in my heart. I am honored and humbled to walk the halls of Cobb and get hugs from students I have not even worked with yet and to get high-fives from the older kids who normally like to tell me they are “too cool” for doing reading activities with Miss Valeria. My students give me so much joy with all their unique ways of showing me love and affection, and I have come to understand that with this care also comes responsibility. I strive to honor these demonstrations of trust by making sure to always keep my students and their rich knowledge and individuality at the forefront of my teaching practices.

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My time at Cobb has helped transform me in only the best way. I have been challenged by difficult situations; I have been put to the test as I have had to come up with solutions without much time to prepare, and I have most importantly been shown the most genuine and pure love from my students. Being at Cobb and experiencing the day-to-day routines and witnessing what my students go through both as students and as individuals with their own interests and stories has allowed me to step back and think about the privileges I hold in that space and also as I think about my own future classroom. My students have taught me to be humble and to understand that this work is in the service of every single person in my classroom, particularly of those whose voices have historically been left out. My students—all of whom are not older than eleven—have taught me far more than I could hope to learn from a textbook. I am grateful to have wonderful teachers who push my thinking and hold me to high standards, yet it is my students at Cobb who push me even further and keep me accountable in everything I do.

I continue to be grateful for every single day that I get to be a part of this literacy program because it means I am being challenged to question the ways I engage with this work in education. Regardless of the official expectations of my position or of any titles, this work goes beyond what can be seen as purely academic at a surface level. This opportunity has allowed me to immerse myself in hands-on experiences in teaching and given me a new sense of purpose. I have wanted to go into the teaching profession because I believe our youth has invaluable lessons to teach us and because they deserve to know that their voices matter. I know that this work is difficult, but we owe it to our students to show up for them and allow them to be visible in every way that makes them who they are in order to disrupt practices that have silenced much of our youth—particularly our youth of color— for far too long. This internship has therefore allowed me to work on the skills that make this ideal a reality and I am humbled to be able to experience this with the wonderful mentors I have gained and the students that make this journey worthwhile. This journey is a constant learning experience and I am grateful I got that email and decided to apply all those months ago because now I have a new community that has given me the best gifts: a renewed sense of purpose and a greater love for teaching.

 

Reviewing 15 Years

 

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One month ago we celebrated our 15th anniversary. As part of the festivities, we created a photo collection of some of our most memorable moments over the years. The process allowed us to reflect on how many students, faculty, community partners and staff have contributed to our success. The photos capture moments ranging from our students traveling to Bolivia and India with the Privett Global Service-Learning program, interning at senate offices with USF in D.C., to protesting at the Women’s March in multiple cities, to inviting some of the most influential leaders of the day. The slideshow highlights our commitment to preparing students for lives of ethical public service and the common good. Thanks to all of our generous sponsors who make our work possible!

 

Planting Seeds of Change Together

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Melissa Tang, Director of Programs, CommunityGrows

As San Francisco is dealing with the consequences of unequal economic growth and gentrification, there is a greater need for communities to band together in solidarity.  

I work for CommunityGrows, a small grassroots youth development organization grown out of the needs of residents from the Western Addition.  Twenty-three years ago, residents came together to reclaim green spaces in the Western Addition. CommunityGrows cultivates gardens with over 1,300 youth each year in low-income diverse communities.  

 

What I love about working for CommunityGrows is our emphasis on collaboration and building bridges with partners.  Community development takes time, presence, persistence, active listening and patience.  Being a small organization, we understand we need to depend on the strengths on our partners in order to achieve our overall mission. It’s through the Mo’ Magic Collaborative that organizations create and develop programming that address the needs of children, youth and their families in the Fillmore District and Western Addition communities.

At the Mo’ Magic meetings, we developed long term relationship and I know I can ask McCarthy Center staff for resources or to collaborate on community-wide projects. McCarthy Center staff attends all our community meetings and listens to what partners need.  Here’s just a few ways how our impact is amplified through our partnership with McCarthy Center:

  • Environmental Studies students and staff worked with us to maintain a garden at New Liberation Church and to develop workshops for our teen program.    
  • We partnered on joint community events like the Mind, Body and Soul health pop-ups, where we led a healthy cooking demo and gave away veggies from our gardens to residents we normally wouldn’t reach.   
  • We are recipients of USF’s Retired Technology program!  For a the last two years, we were able to provide a workstation for each staff member and dedicated our funding towards programming.

 

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During my time as a graduate student at USF (Masters of Nonprofit Administration, ‘16), I heard USF’s motto: Change the world from here.  Through these partnerships, not only are students learning how to change the world in the neighborhood that surrounds the campus but they engage them in real problems that affect real people, people who happen to live directly next to the campus.  There are a lot of dedicated folks who are doing great work to make changes in the Western Addition but they can’t do it alone. USF partnerships will strengthen the work of these organizations and provide education to students that a book can’t teach you.  So when USF asks students to change the world from here, the change is not on USF’s campus, but right here in the neighborhood—in the Western Addition.