Learning to Care About Politics

Hallie Balch, McCarthy Sacramento Fellow 2017

Something that I often hear from family members, friends, and teachers is, “The government doesn’t work.” Chances are, if you’re familiar with American politics, you have heard or even said something similar yourself. This was the mindset that I even had as I prepared for my internship with the McCarthy Fellows program. Pessimistic? Sure, but political inaction is prevalent within our society.

As a student at Dominican University, I have been surrounded by people with different political ideologies throughout my college experience. I came to the McCarthy Fellows program expecting liberal individuals with a streamlined theory on politics and little room for my own conservative ways of thinking. What I found in the Fellows was actually quite different – a unique group of people like me, eager to learn and better understand the ways of our government in California.

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This is the most important observation from my time in Sacramento is—just because someone holds different beliefs does not mean their reasons are not valid or that they lack a voice or passion. In my McCarthy Fellows cohort, we each study politics and government in our respective fields. To be a part of the process is eye-opening, to say the very least. For example, I comb through hundreds of bills every day that have an impact on my home district, my community, and people that I love. I study legislation that people may never see or notice. These are bills that legislators craft with teams of policymakers and spend months perfecting. This is a side of government that the public does not see.

I see policymakers in the Capitol working every day to negotiate across the aisle to craft policy that will benefit constituents. This is not what people outside of the Capitol see. They don’t see Assemblymembers buzzing around on the floor, lobbying to get votes from their colleagues for hours on end. They don’t see the effects that a seemingly monotonous bill on water consolidation will have on a community struggling to gain access to reliable, clean drinking water. They don’t see the countless staffers researching bill after bill in order to maximize the benefits for the state of California as a whole.  My greatest takeaway from the McCarthy Fellowship thus far—California’s state government is active. I just have not been staying involved with the politics that have the potential to impact my life.

It can be hard to stay up to date with the ins and outs of policies and procedures, but it is important to try and stay informed. The resources are there and the members of the California Assembly and Senate constantly try to reach out to the constituents of their state. Additionally, legislators are consistently working to pass legislation to increase transparency and open the lines of communication between government and the people. The next step is to use the tools and resources that our government provides us.  One can tune into the Assembly floor while they’re in session and listen to the debates taking place. One can get in contact with their district representative if they’re not happy about something in their community. Getting involved is not hard, one just hard to start taking action.

If we are not informed about what is happening in the world, how can we possibly expect to enact any positive change? I cannot express how important it is to understand what is going on in our government. Not only in Sacramento, with its fast-paced politics and savvy legislators, but also in our individual communities. So the next time you feel like throwing government under the bus, try researching it. Try learning about it. Try understanding it. After all, we’re all in the same bus and who says someone has to be thrown under it?

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What Pride Means to Me

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Amanda Mitchell, ’15

B.A. Theology & Religious Studies

As a San Francisco resident, a staff member of USF, and a McCarthy Center Alum of multiple programs  (Advocate for Community Engagement, ACE Global Fellow, Sacramento Fellow, and Public Service and Community Engagement Minor), I am honored to share my thoughts and perspective on Pride as a queer multiracial cis-gendered woman. I write with deep humility and understanding that I can only speak from my own experiences. By no means are my views representative of the whole LGBTQIA+ community, but I do strive to give voice to certain experiences that lend an opportunity for solidarity and invitational dialogue.

During my Undergrad at USF, the McCarthy Center and the amazing people who worked there became a safe and brave place for me. A place where I could be challenged, as well as challenge others. A place where questions only led to more questions and less answers, and a place to sit within that discomfort and learn from it. A place where I could explore my identity and discover the power of community and share identities. A place where I found my voice. I have had a very fortunate experience with my education and my exploration of self, but I am painfully aware that my positive experience was privileged and not the majority.  

June, as San Francisco Pride Month, is a time for the LGBTQ community to come together, as well as welcome allies into our space. Though the word pride tends to have a connotation of celebration, unity, and achievement— in my experience, Pride for the Queer community during this month also carries the weight of injustice, hatred, persecution,struggle, and separation. I acknowledge the immense advantage I have being a Queer woman who is able to work for a welcoming institution that advocates for social justice (and has a wonderful contingent during the Pride parade), and to live in a city that celebrates my identities. Every person has their own story and lived experiences and Pride, especially in San Francisco, is a time to reflect on history, stand up to injustice, and participate in healing.

Personally, Pride month is a reminder that everyone has their own story and struggle, but also, a reminder that there is a community that stands together. No matter who you are, where you are, or what your story is, you are not alone. This month, I hope to hold my happiness, success, sadness, and pain for the LGBTQ community in my mind and heart, and to continue to walk forward in gratitude, perseverance, and pride.

#Pride  #LoveIsLove  #LoveWins  #MyNameIs  #IStandWithOrlando