Love to the Class of 2018

Female student in cap and gown

Crystal Vega, Urban Studies and Critical Diversity Studies ’18, was awarded this year’s Leo T. McCarthy Award. Below is her commencement speech. 

Dear Class of 2018, I love you. You, the first generation students who paved the road for so many to come. You, the nonbinary and trans students who are constantly pushing the university to be a more gender inclusive space. You, the Black and Brown students who will not rest until this university makes everyone feel at home. You, the Pacific Islander and indigenous students who reflect the beauty, bravery, and courage of your communities. I am honored and humbled to be speaking in front of so many student leaders and activists. And lastly, I love me, the queer Chicanx with two jobs, two majors, one minor, and three years of college under their belt. I love you: I don’t use these three words lightly. And I’ve definitely never said it to a few hundred people but I believe it serves as a crucial last lesson.

Some of you in the room may be uncomfortable right now. Having a physical reaction to the word love. It’s okay, I was the same way. There was a point in my life where I stopped saying I love you to my friends and family. I started to feel weighed down by stories of trauma and my own experiences with misgendering, microaggressions, and discrimination. So I stopped. It wasn’t until I started a romantic relationship with my current partner of three years that I finally started using the words again. He helped me to see love as personal and interpersonal healing. Although I didn’t learn about love at USF, I did start to practice revolutionary love while in a classroom. I saw Valarie Kaur’s Ted Talk on revolutionary love and watched as she reclaimed love as “…sweet labor. Fierce. Bloody. Imperfect. Life-giving. A choice we make over and over again” and our greatest tool for social justice.

Throughout our years at USF, we have heard the phrase change the world from here. But what this phrase does not suggest is the burnout that happens after we resolve to do this. This is why we need to center ourselves in gratitude and love: a love of ourselves, for others, and for our opponents. Love not only allows me to envision a world of equity and inclusivity but can also empower me to run for local office and make that world a reality. Love can drive your passions whether they be in the public sector, reinvesting in low-income communities and improving our public transit systems, or in the private sector, reimagining how people connect to one another or innovating medicine as we know it. When someone says you can’t, when you tell yourself you won’t, center yourself in love. Wonder what you are capable of, value the humanity of others, and acknowledge those who see you as different because love wins. Congratulations Class of 2018!

Introducing the 2018 McCarthy Fellows

Group of USF students

Congratulations to our newest cohort of McCarthy Fellows in Sacramento. This upcoming summer, thirteen students will be experiencing first-hand the policymaking and advocacy in our California state capitol. In addition to a rigorous course on California politics, the Fellows will also be interning full-time at various organizations, department agencies, Assemblymember and State Senate offices.

This 12-week program combines a service learning course concurrent with a real-world application through a public service internship. Our Fellows will get a front row seat to observe and learn how public policy happens at the state level and build the skill set necessary to be change leaders in their communities.

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Alexis Arellanes, Politics ‘18

Alexis completed her BA in Politics with a minor in Legal Studies. Her undergraduate work experience includes a congressional internship in Washington D.C, lobbying for funding on behalf of USF here in Sacramento, and working with various educational nonprofit organizations that aim to help underfunded schools. Throughout her academic and work experiences, Alexis witnessed first-hand how income inequality negatively impacts school funding and jeopardizes access to educational resources. During her time in Sacramento, she hopes her exposure to legislative research and policy-making processes will provide the knowledge and skill set needed for a hands-on approach to policy formulation.

Male student

Alhaji Kabba, Nursing ’20

Alhaji is a rising nursing student excited about joining the McCarthy Fellows cohort. He is originally from Sierra Leone and is excited to experience California state politics, particularly public policy issues as it relates and connects criminal justice issues with health-related policy. He looks forward to learning more about policymaking, improving his advocacy skills, and being in a better position to affect change at a community level and strengthen the capacity of vulnerable communities.

 

Male student

 

Pascal Boctor, International Studies and Sociology ‘19

Pascal Boctor is a Junior majoring in International Studies. He is most excited about to build upon the skills he has established at USF and to acquire new professional skills. His goal for the summer is to achieve a better understanding of state legislation and has aspirations of one day running for office on either the state or federal level. Pascal hopes that with the experiences gained, he will have a better understanding of topics, cultures, and identities that are different than his own.

Female student

Madeline Campbell, Politics, Public Service and Community Engagement ’20

Madeline is excited to join the McCarthy Fellows to acquire more knowledge about the policymaking process at the state level. Born and raised in Sacramento, she is well versed in the city’s issues but is eager to learn more about state politics. Madeline is interested in the intersection of criminal justice and education policy and wants to enhance her policy analysis skills so she can positively affect her community.

Female Student

Teresita Estevez, Politics and Peace and Justice ‘18

Teresita is excited to be joining the McCarthy Fellows in Sacramento this summer and looks forward to gaining first-hand experience working with and expanding her knowledge of California policy-making processes. Through this program, she plans to further develop her interpersonal engagement and analytical skills in the public service sphere.

 

Female Student

Tanya Leon, Chapman University, Political Science and Peace Studies ‘19

Tanya Leon, is a rising Senior at Chapman University. She is excited to expand her understanding of the unique Californian political climate and legislative process. She also hopes to continue to develop her research and analytical skills. Her time in the McCarthy Fellows program will give her the skillset to take what she learns in Sacramento and apply it back at home in Southern California.

Male Student

Glenn McDonell, University of San Diego, Political Science and Economics, ‘19

Glenn has spent the past two summers observing the convention process at the RNC as a media intern and interacting with policy in a non-profit advocacy setting. He will be joining the McCarthy Fellows Program in Sacramento this summer to gain an understanding of California policy-making and hopes to develop skills in research and writing. He also hopes to do discern a career path in policy, whether that means public service or non-profit advocacy.

Female student

Tara Minaee, Nursing, ‘20

Tara will be joining the McCarthy Fellows Program in Sacramento this summer to pursue a different side of nursing, the legislative side. She plans to use this time to see what goes on behind the scenes in healthcare, to get a better understanding of the policies and laws that she learns about and abides by in nursing school. With this whole other side to nursing and healthcare, she hopes to gain valuable experience that can be utilized throughout her nursing career.

Female Student

Mutale Mulenga, Kinesiology, Child and Youth Studies, Sociology, ‘20

Mutale has spent the past year working for San Francisco Rising, an organization focused on creating an electoral alliance that helps to build power for working class communities of color in San Francisco. She has worked on a year-long inclusive campaign to fund college tuition for Californians that would include the formerly incarcerated and undocumented students. The McCarthy fellowship will provide a different perspective of how change is made on a governmental scale compared to the grassroots level to help her navigate how she would like to create change in healthcare.

Female student

Cassie Murphy, Sociology & International Studies ’20

Cassie will be joining the McCarthy Fellows cohort to expand on her political research skills and see California environmental policy up close. She’s excited to expand her network and meet people with similar passions. After the program, she wants to apply this new knowledge as a starting point for her work with conservation policy in rural Peru as she conducts research abroad next semester.

Justin Nkemere6

Justin Nkemere, Communications Studies, ‘20

Justin is a rising Junior and is excited about joining the McCarthy Center cohort. He most excited about not only learning the in’s and out’s of state government, but also how to help his community in the future. He wants to expand his knowledge of how state and local politics works and how to best go about changing the inequitable circumstances of specific populations. Justin is also looking forward on sharpening his professional and networking skills through in this experience by working with and learning from various legislatures and agency organizations.  

 

Female student

Lillian Tu, Communication Studies & Environmental Studies, ’18

Lillian is really enthusiastic about learning the general California policy and politics this summer and becoming more familiar with environmental policies in particular. She is ready to take up a new challenge and get informed on some important local issues and their legislation. After completing the program, she hopes to apply her hands-on experience towards a future career in environmental advocacy and policy.

After a Semester with USF in DC

 

Girl in professional attire

Jacqueline Garcia, Politics ’19, is a Newmark scholar as well as a recipient of the Betty L. Blakley scholarship

USF in D.C.—what an experience! On many levels and in ways I didn’t expect, the semester I spent in Washington D.C. changed me. I’ve always had an interest in public service and the common good; one of that typical twenty-something-year-old, “change the world” mentalities. The McCarthy center gave me the opportunity to put my class teachings and my personal aspirations into practice. Experience is truly the best teacher.

During my USF in DC experience, I interned at the National Immigration Forum (NIF), a non-profit advocacy group pushing for fair immigration reform. I was the Field and Advocacy intern for the organization’s Bible, Badges, and Business (BBB) program.  This experience was extremely valuable. First, it gave me insight in regards to what an advocacy group looks like from the inside. I learned the tactics and strategies used to keep members informed and also how to include members in the process of action planning. Second, I acquired new skills while working at the NIF. In particular, I learned to use different software systems like Salesforce and Cision. Lastly, the BBB program is targeted at moderate to conservative-leaning groups. As a native Californian, some of the views these groups hold were foreign to me. At the NIF, I was provided the opportunity to get out of my liberal bubble and worked with people who had opposing views to my own. What I learned about myself was that I am more tolerant than I thought and that my own views are subject to change. This experience gave me a new perspective of the world I live in and my place in it.

While in D.C. I tried to get out into the city as much as I could. It’s a dynamic place with a lot to see and even more to learn. Nearly 50% of the population in D.C. is African-American. Almost every Lyft or Uber driver I had was an immigrant from either Africa or Latin America. This city runs on the labor of these minority groups yet the administration right down the street ignores their needs. So, going to D.C. was a great learning experience and also a form of validation for myself.

As young people, we have ideas of who we want to be, but there are inevitably moments of doubt that we can actually accomplish those aspirations. D.C. allowed me to expel that doubt. It energized my ambitions to work with the immigrant community. I took part in protests with organizations like United We Dream. I was able to experience advocacy work first hand. I sat in on conference meetings, press conferences, and networking events where I learned about research. I learned about career paths I’d never heard of. Although there is no way I could give a definitive answer to the question of what I want to do post-graduation, I have a few ideas. The ideas I have now differ from the ideas I had before my semester in D.C.

However, I gained more than professional insight. I gained perspective about myself and my place in this world. Self-care and self-love were practices that I learned to implement in my life while in D.C. How could I assist others if I wasn’t taking care with myself? I did not expect to come back with so much personal growth under my belt. As a young woman, this experience helped me find my voice. I am beyond happy with my experience. It helped me zone in on possible career paths for myself. And more importantly, it has influenced my thoughts and motivations. I’m extremely grateful and proud of the person I have become after my USF in DC experience.

Congrats to our 2017-18 Award-Winners!

As the end of the school year draws nearer, we reflect on all the people who have helped to advance our mission. Our 2017-18 awards recognize emerging leaders and influential community partners that value public service and the common good.  Please join us in congratulating them!

Young woman in suit

Crystal Vega, ’18

2018 Leo T. McCarthy Award for Public Service

This award is presented to the graduating senior who, during their career at USF, worked to promote social justice through public service to create a more humane and just world. The award was established in honor of Leo T. McCarthy, recognized for his work for San Francisco and the State of California as a County Supervisor, Speaker of the Assembly, and as a three-term Lieutenant Governor who dedicated himself to those marginalized by the political process.

 

Giorgia Scezelo, Politics ’18 The School of Management Valedictorian  

Ali Defazio, Politics ’18  College of Arts and Sciences Valedictorian 

The valedictorian of the schools and colleges within the University of San Francisco exemplify the highest standards of leadership and scholarship in the Jesuit tradition. A leader in the finest sense of the word, the Valedictorian demonstrates selfless service to the University community while reflecting excellence in all academic pursuits.

Mrs. Lynnette White   |   Ms. Altheda Carrie   |    Ms. Brenda Harris

2018 Engage San Francisco Community Partner Awards for Western Addition Changemakers

The Engage San Francisco’ s Community Partnership award recognizes community members who have been critical to realizing the vision of our initiative. These three women have supported Dr. Stephanie Sears and Dr. David Holler and the Ester Madriz Scholars and the Martín-Baró Scholars over the past three years as students have gathered biographical information on the African American Changemakers depicted on the mural outside the Ella Hill Hutch Community Center. Their advisement, suggestions, connections, and knowledge have been instrumental to this project. 

Girls in caps and gowns

Mission Graduates

Community Partner Service-Learning Award

This award is presented to a USF community partner in recognition of outstanding service-learning collaboration with USF faculty members to co-educate students. The recipient of the award demonstrates institutional commitment to service-learning by providing meaningful student projects and service experiences, educating students on social justice issues, and facilitating mutually beneficial outcomes for students, faculty, and their own organization.

 

Beyond the McCarthy Center, one of our staff members has won a prestigious award in the community engagement field.

 

Young man in suit

Fernando Enciso-Márquez

2018 Richard E. Cone Award for Emerging Leaders in Community Engagement

The California Campus Compact award recognizes an exemplary early-career individual who is an emerging leader in the field of community engagement, whose work has had a positive impact on campus and in the community, and who is guided by the best practices of community-campus partnerships

 

Congratulations to our well-deserving students, partners, and colleagues!

How Cobb Elementary Transformed Me

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Valeria Imendia, International Studies’18

I still remember receiving an email about a literacy internship opportunity during the fall semester of my junior year and thinking it would be a great chance for me to expand my experiences in education. As a student in the Dual Degree Program for Teacher Preparation, I decided to apply to be a literacy intern through Engage San Francisco but little did I know I would be embarking on an experience of a lifetime. I am now a senior, about to graduate this coming May, and I continue to learn so much about myself and my passion for teaching with every chance I get to walk the halls of Dr. William L. Cobb Elementary School.

From my very first day of the internship, I was met with nothing but kindness and support. My first impression of the school was more than I could have hoped for, and it continues to be a place of unique learning experiences for me. For one, every day at Cobb is different—whether it is because I have to work with new students and create activities for them on my own or because unexpected situations arise where I have to provide care for students. I first went in thinking of myself as a tutor for my students, but it was not long after I started my work there that I realized this job required a lot more than just academics. Every single student I have had the privilege to work with at this school has sparked so much passion for teaching within me, and I continue to think about them in everything I do as I pursue my teaching credential.

Alongside my students, my mentor at the school and my internship supervisor always go above and beyond to ensure that as interns we are being supported and guided in the best way possible. It has been thanks to their warmth and guidance that I have been able to feel like I have agency in my position as an intern. From day one, I have felt like I am a part of the school community and that is because I have been given the tools and the trust to bring my perspective into the work I do with my students. Hence, this program has been crucial in my journey as a future educator because it has shown me first-hand that there is a lot of work to be done in the classroom. It has likewise shown me in practice what my responsibility as a woman of color going into this profession looks like in order to ensure I am doing my best to advocate for our youth. My students have therefore opened up new possibilities within me and they have taken me by the hand and walked me through their life experiences and their passions, which is something that will be forever engraved in my heart. I am honored and humbled to walk the halls of Cobb and get hugs from students I have not even worked with yet and to get high-fives from the older kids who normally like to tell me they are “too cool” for doing reading activities with Miss Valeria. My students give me so much joy with all their unique ways of showing me love and affection, and I have come to understand that with this care also comes responsibility. I strive to honor these demonstrations of trust by making sure to always keep my students and their rich knowledge and individuality at the forefront of my teaching practices.

Valeria-4

My time at Cobb has helped transform me in only the best way. I have been challenged by difficult situations; I have been put to the test as I have had to come up with solutions without much time to prepare, and I have most importantly been shown the most genuine and pure love from my students. Being at Cobb and experiencing the day-to-day routines and witnessing what my students go through both as students and as individuals with their own interests and stories has allowed me to step back and think about the privileges I hold in that space and also as I think about my own future classroom. My students have taught me to be humble and to understand that this work is in the service of every single person in my classroom, particularly of those whose voices have historically been left out. My students—all of whom are not older than eleven—have taught me far more than I could hope to learn from a textbook. I am grateful to have wonderful teachers who push my thinking and hold me to high standards, yet it is my students at Cobb who push me even further and keep me accountable in everything I do.

I continue to be grateful for every single day that I get to be a part of this literacy program because it means I am being challenged to question the ways I engage with this work in education. Regardless of the official expectations of my position or of any titles, this work goes beyond what can be seen as purely academic at a surface level. This opportunity has allowed me to immerse myself in hands-on experiences in teaching and given me a new sense of purpose. I have wanted to go into the teaching profession because I believe our youth has invaluable lessons to teach us and because they deserve to know that their voices matter. I know that this work is difficult, but we owe it to our students to show up for them and allow them to be visible in every way that makes them who they are in order to disrupt practices that have silenced much of our youth—particularly our youth of color— for far too long. This internship has therefore allowed me to work on the skills that make this ideal a reality and I am humbled to be able to experience this with the wonderful mentors I have gained and the students that make this journey worthwhile. This journey is a constant learning experience and I am grateful I got that email and decided to apply all those months ago because now I have a new community that has given me the best gifts: a renewed sense of purpose and a greater love for teaching.

 

Save the Date – Nov. 9 for Our 15th Anniversary

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On November 9, 2017, friends and supporters, alums, faculty and currents students will celebrate the Leo T. McCarthy Center and 15 years of training a new generation of ethical leaders. It’s an evening of recognizing the vision and legacy of co-founder Leo McCarthy, former San Francisco legislator, California Speaker of the Assembly and Lieutenant Governor.

We’ll mark this milestone by celebrating the continuation of Leo McCarthy’s values of service for the common good through the current programs of the McCarthy Center with students who have participated locally and internationally through the Privett Global Scholars, USF in D.C., McCarthy Fellows in Sacramento, Advocates  Community Engagement and our graduate degree programs in Urban and Public Affairs.

The night will begin with a reception followed by the presentation of the inaugural Leo T. McCarthy Award, to be given to the The Honorable Art Agnos, former San Francisco mayor, assembly member and regional head of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

Next Generation with title
Today more than ever, the world needs future leaders who think critically and respond compassionately. Join us in preparing the next generation of ethical leaders and the programs that serve them—by becoming a sponsor or attending. Visit http://rsvp.usfca.edu/mccarthy-sponsorship-2017 or email Leslie Lombre, Associate Director at  llombre@usfca.edu or call (415) 422-2983.

Save The Date