How Bolivia Is Changing My Perspective

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Natalie Caprile, Sociology and Pre-Med ’18 

Before the Privett Global Scholars program, I had never spent more than two weeks outside of the U.S. The thought of changing that through such a challenging program was daunting. However, being in Bolivia and having the opportunity to open myself up to the people here, as well as listen to their experiences, has given me an increased understanding of the world and myself.

One of my most challenging and rewarding experiences thus far has been the work I have done with my organization, Vivo en Positivo. Vivo does work surrounding HIV and AIDS (primary and secondary prevention, direct support for people living with HIV, as well as their family and loved ones, etc.) throughout Bolivia. For my project, I am focusing on primary prevention among youth in Cochabamba. To meet this end, we are going to middle and high schools in five municipalities and performing training sessions on HIV, human rights, and discrimination.

To prepare for these trainings, I conducted research, created PowerPoint presentations, and designed an informative brochure. Even with all this preparation, I felt the nerves as we went to our first training. I did not have complete confidence in my ability to talk in Spanish about such a specific topic for an hour. I sat back and listened to my coworkers lead the presentation while writing down key concepts on the board and passing other materials out to the students.

At the end of the training session, my coworker asked if there were any questions. One student raised her hand, pointed at me, and point-blank asked, “What does she think? Why hasn’t she said anything?” I could feel my heart beating, but I responded, “Sorry that I haven’t been talking a lot–I’m still working towards speaking Spanish fluently. But, for me, the most important thing is that you all know your rights and have correct information. I hope that you can talk about this amongst yourselves and with your other friends and family.” The young woman who asked the question nodded her head at me in response. I survived my first session.

The next day, I was leading training sessions on my own in a different school. Though my coworkers have been helpful and understanding while I have worked on my project, I was pushed out of my comfort zone pretty quickly. Other than learning how to lead an hour-long presentation in Spanish, I have also learned how important transparency and honesty are in doing work with communities in which you are an outsider.

When I go to schools to lead sessions, I own up to where I am from and what I am doing in this community. I touch on what I hope to bring as well as what I have learned from people and experiences here, and I encourage students to ask questions or call me out if they feel it is necessary. After multiple sessions, I have had students (mostly young women) come up to me and thank me for coming, ask me for more information, or ask if we can lead these sessions in other areas of their communities.

At the request of one of the principals from a school in which we held trainings, we have already branched out with our sessions. We held two at an organization that offers food, shelter, and activities to local children with less access to resources. After finishing the trainings there, they asked us to come back and hold more sessions.

I love doing work that allows me to have interactions with people in communities in Cochabamba. This project has given me more than just public speaking skills or technical knowledge about HIV. I have been fortunate enough to have real conversations with students who allowed me to see into parts of their lives. Some of them have told me stories that have changed the way I conceptualize things like health, family, and responsibility. Because of this, I have gained a greater understanding of others and myself on a global scale. The way I see things has shifted. There is no going back from here.

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Global Privett Scholars Summer Update

The 2017 Global Privett Scholars are spending the summer in Bolivia and Argentina working on community-based sustainable development projects. Our students are cultivating an appreciation for their responsibilities as global citizens and developing personal skills, professional competencies, and values consistent with the mission of the University of San Francisco.

Scholars in Cochabamba, Bolivia  

 Gio Paganini – CeDRUS (Centro de Desarrollo Rural y Urbano Sustentable)

“I’m really excited about meeting my host family in Bolivia. I’m from South America and can’t wait to be able to see how other countries in the continent live. Working side by side South Americans is a priceless experience.”

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Natalia Caprile – Vivo en Positivo

“I’m looking forward to meeting people in my host family and organization, and to start growing in community with them. After learning so much about the social, political, and historical contexts of Bolivia, I’m ready to jump in and start to experience life there!” 

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Juliet Baires – Pro Mujer Bolivia

“I will be working with Pro Mujer, a nonprofit organization that works to support women who are living in the conditions of socioeconomic exclusion. I am excited to be a part of a movement that supports women with their small businesses, while recognizing and including women’s values and potential, opening the door for women to have an active role in their own personal and community development.” 

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Diego Jones – Tukuy Pacha

“I’m really excited about three things: meeting my new family, working at my internship, and taking cool pictures of Bolivia. I’m really looking forward to also meet the rest of the U.S. students who will be working with the Foundation for Sustainable Development (FSD) this summer.” 

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Carter Santini – Martadero

“I’m filled with both excitement and nerves. My job placement at Martadero seems like a gift from the heavens as it aligns all my interests in music, community development and public service. I’m excited to throw myself into a new place and give my all.”

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Rosa Olascoaga- Performing Life

“I am super excited to be an intern at Performing Life. I can’t wait to work with young people and to be surrounded with the beautiful culture in Bolivia.”

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Rachel Starling- Asociación Amigos del Árbol, Bosques, y Parques Nacionales

“I’m hoping to learn more about the role of community engagement in development this summer.  I’m looking forward to the challenge that working in another language presents, and I’m excited for the chance to work in my community with the issues that are important to me.”

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Kaitlin Chassagne- Caminar Con Valores

“Although I was nervous for the language barrier with my rusty Spanish skills, my host organization has done a wonderful job integrating me into their community and making me feel both needed and welcomed. I’m excited to apply my perspectives as an outsider raised in other countries and schools to their newest project focused on gender perspectives.”

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Elizabeth Spears- CeDRUS (Centro de Desarrollo Rural y Urbano Sustentable)

“I’m most excited to be in a position to learn about how the local people of Salta understand their relationship to the non-human world, or the rest of the environment. Also, I am looking forward to seeing how the relationships between people and their environment differ between a community in city of Salta, San Rafael and an indigenous community farther north in the province, Pichanal.”

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Janelle Nunez- Caminar Con Valores

“I am looking forward to putting into action everything I’ve learning in the classroom. I’m excited to participate in a cultural experience unlike any other and I look forward to all the new amazing relationships I make along the way.”

Save the Date – Nov. 9 for Our 15th Anniversary

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On November 9, 2017, friends and supporters, alums, faculty and currents students will celebrate the Leo T. McCarthy Center and 15 years of training a new generation of ethical leaders. It’s an evening of recognizing the vision and legacy of co-founder Leo McCarthy, former San Francisco legislator, California Speaker of the Assembly and Lieutenant Governor.

We’ll mark this milestone by celebrating the continuation of Leo McCarthy’s values of service for the common good through the current programs of the McCarthy Center with students who have participated locally and internationally through the Privett Global Scholars, USF in D.C., McCarthy Fellows in Sacramento, Advocates  Community Engagement and our graduate degree programs in Urban and Public Affairs.

The night will begin with a reception followed by the presentation of the inaugural Leo T. McCarthy Award, to be given to the The Honorable Art Agnos, former San Francisco mayor, assembly member and regional head of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

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Today more than ever, the world needs future leaders who think critically and respond compassionately. Join us in preparing the next generation of ethical leaders and the programs that serve them—by becoming a sponsor or attending. Visit http://rsvp.usfca.edu/mccarthy-sponsorship-2017 or email Leslie Lombre, Associate Director at  llombre@usfca.edu or call (415) 422-2983.

Save The Date

What Pride Means to Me

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Amanda Mitchell, ’15

B.A. Theology & Religious Studies

As a San Francisco resident, a staff member of USF, and a McCarthy Center Alum of multiple programs  (Advocate for Community Engagement, ACE Global Fellow, Sacramento Fellow, and Public Service and Community Engagement Minor), I am honored to share my thoughts and perspective on Pride as a queer multiracial cis-gendered woman. I write with deep humility and understanding that I can only speak from my own experiences. By no means are my views representative of the whole LGBTQIA+ community, but I do strive to give voice to certain experiences that lend an opportunity for solidarity and invitational dialogue.

During my Undergrad at USF, the McCarthy Center and the amazing people who worked there became a safe and brave place for me. A place where I could be challenged, as well as challenge others. A place where questions only led to more questions and less answers, and a place to sit within that discomfort and learn from it. A place where I could explore my identity and discover the power of community and share identities. A place where I found my voice. I have had a very fortunate experience with my education and my exploration of self, but I am painfully aware that my positive experience was privileged and not the majority.  

June, as San Francisco Pride Month, is a time for the LGBTQ community to come together, as well as welcome allies into our space. Though the word pride tends to have a connotation of celebration, unity, and achievement— in my experience, Pride for the Queer community during this month also carries the weight of injustice, hatred, persecution,struggle, and separation. I acknowledge the immense advantage I have being a Queer woman who is able to work for a welcoming institution that advocates for social justice (and has a wonderful contingent during the Pride parade), and to live in a city that celebrates my identities. Every person has their own story and lived experiences and Pride, especially in San Francisco, is a time to reflect on history, stand up to injustice, and participate in healing.

Personally, Pride month is a reminder that everyone has their own story and struggle, but also, a reminder that there is a community that stands together. No matter who you are, where you are, or what your story is, you are not alone. This month, I hope to hold my happiness, success, sadness, and pain for the LGBTQ community in my mind and heart, and to continue to walk forward in gratitude, perseverance, and pride.

#Pride  #LoveIsLove  #LoveWins  #MyNameIs  #IStandWithOrlando

Calling All McCarthy Center Alumni!

We’re excited to announce the formation of the McCarthy Center’s Alumni Committee — to rally our alumni around the Center’s new students, events and the upcoming 15th Anniversary! A small group of dedicated undergraduate and graduate alumni have come together to organize our support of current and future students, and the USF community as a whole.

The committee is comprised of active and dedicated alumni volunteers from all McCarthy Center class years, programs, and majors. The current committee includes:  

  • Rebecca McDowell, Master of Public Affairs 2016, Mayor’s Office of Education
  • Rodd Lee, Master of Public Affairs 2014, BART
  • Jennifer Ratliff, Master of Urban Affairs 2016, USF School of Management 
  • Pete Byrne, Master of Urban Affairs 2016, San Francisco Office of Short Term Rentals
  • Lunna Lopes, B.A. 2006, Public Policy Institute of California
  • Nico Bremond, SF Magic Zone
  • Andrea Wise, M.A. 2013, UC Berkeley Public Service Center

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Mission

The mission of the Alumni Committee is to create a strong and unified alumni presence at all signature McCarthy Center events, activities and traditions in and around our community. They will work closely with the McCarthy Center Board and staff. A strong alumni coalition also presents the opportunity to continue spreading the word about McCarthy Center undergraduate and graduate programs.

The Committee members were initially invited by the Center’s Director to serve for a minimum one-year term. Going forward, the  Alumni Committee will develop a subsequent application process and the length of terms during the first year.

While USF currently has a strong alumni relations network, this Committee will focus on specifically serving McCarthy Center students and alumni with the priorities of:

  • Adopting the alumni relations core values of excellence, lifelong relationships, lifelong learning, inclusiveness and diversity, global citizenship, advocacy, and USF pride;
  • Participating in alumni board meetings and functions, regional alumni chapter events and other university functions
  • Organizing at least one alumni event with assistance from McCarthy Center staff during the spring or summer semester;
  • Communicating the mission and purpose of the McCarthy Center and Alumni Steering Committee to the wider alumni population;
  • Supporting a strong relationship between the McCarthy Center Board, alumni and current students in career planning, placement and transitions;
  • Encouraging highly qualified and diverse prospective students to attend USF and enroll in McCarthy Center programs and degrees.

What’s Next?

McCarthy Center Alumni are encouraged to stay tuned for an update from the committee. There will be a variety of ways to become involved including:

  • Upcoming events including the 15th Leo T. McCarthy Anniversary celebration, November 9, 2017 and the speakers series, Conversations for the Common Good beginning in 2018
  • On-going recruiting efforts
  • Networking opportunities
  • Welcoming and mentoring students
  • Supporting job and internship searches for current students and recent graduates

In the meantime, if you are one of our alumni, undergraduate or graduate, please make sure to update your contact information here!

See some of our alumni at the recent 15th Anniversary Kick-off in Sacramento held last month at Frank Fat’s in our Flickr album.

Profiles in Community Engaged Learning- Nicola McClung

Nicola was asked, what inspires you to integrate service-learning or community-engaged pedagogies into your courses?

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Nicola McClung

Assistant Professor, University of San Francisco- School of Education

Excerpt from the August 2016 Profiles in Community Engaged Learning. Professor McClung teaches Early Literacy.

I was first inspired to integrate community-engaged pedagogy into my course when looking for books for my daughter. She is a beginning reader, and I had difficulty finding books I wanted her to read.

Although multicultural children’s literature clearly makes an important contribution to the pursuit of equity and justice for all, it continues to be limited in several ways. Enter any classroom, home, or pediatrician’s office where an effort is being made to include diverse perspectives, and one will typically find books about able-bodied heteronormative white children living “normal” lives: a new puppy; bedtime; mom, dad, and baby; expressing emotions; going to school. In the same room, recent titles reflecting diversity might include: Heather has Two Mommies; Don’t Call Me Special; Black, White, Just Right; It’s Okay To Be Different; I Love My Hair; Day of the Dead, The Skin You Live In, Some Kids are Deaf, or Everybody Cooks Rice.  That is, few books include characters that come from diverse backgrounds in which their social markers (e.g., the disability, being black, having gay parents) are not the focus of the book. Furthermore, when diversity is reflected, many authors fail to write in such a way that allows for independent reading and maximally supports children’s literacy skills. For example, although there are some picture books that contain anti-oppressive themes (e.g., African American History) they are almost always books that must be read aloud to children.

I also draw from my experiences as a teacher in San Francisco schools, including at Rosa Parks Elementary in the Western Addition.  The project is based on the assumption that having access to texts that reflect diverse perspectives is motivating; in addition to high quality multicultural literature, we need books that contain universal themes depicting minority characters living everyday lives—e.g., a scientist who is a black female, a school principal who is multilingual, a soccer player with a disability, a mailperson who is trans, or kids simply having fun! These types of books are greatly needed for children from minority backgrounds to identify as readers and to see themselves as valued members of society. At the same time, such books allow students who identify with the dominant culture to come to see their minority counterparts as central to a well-functioning society (Dean-Meyers, 2014).

At the end of the summer, seeing the Prince Hall students excited about being authors, and seeing themselves in the books, inspires me to continue to the project and sustain the community partnership. Likewise, knowing that we are in some small way closing the cultural/linguistic distance between teachers in training and students in urban schools provides a purpose to the work that is important to sustain.

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